Friday Photos: Mood Board

In shul this morning, a guy sitting next to me said: “Hey, your techeles matches your shoes!”

In shul, a guy sitting next to me said: “Hey, your techeles matches your shoes!”

This morning, after Daf Yomi, my friend turned to me and said: “Some week, huh?”

I said: “It seems that every week is some week.”

“Yeah.”

On that downer, let’s try and alter the mood with some photos and stories.

Recently, I caught a really wonderful film on TCM, I Was an Adventuress ('40) starring Zorina, Erich von Stroheim, Peter Lorre, and Richard Greene. I never heard of the film before. Catch it if you can, it's a little gem about con artists.

Recently, I caught a wonderful film on TCM, I Was an Adventuress (’40) starring Zorina, Erich von Stroheim, Peter Lorre, and Richard Greene. I never heard of the film before. Catch it if you can, it’s a delightful gem about con artists. You just never know when a good film is going to sneak up and grab your attention.

 

Seeta Devi (1912 - 1983) born Renee Smith, an Anglo Indian, was one of the first stars of silent Indian film industry. The Light of Asia ('25) was her debut film, and it made her an instant star.

Seeta Devi (1912 – 1983) born Renee Smith, was an Anglo Indian who was one of the first stars of the silent Indian film industry. The Light of Asia (’25) was her debut film, and it made her an instant celebrity.

 

Mary Nolan (1902 - 1948) b. Mary Imogene Robertson, was a Ziegfeld girl at the age of 15. Her nickname was “Bubbles.” She gained notoriety for her very public affair with Frank Tinney, a huge vaudeville star who was very married. Nolan eventually made her way to Hollywood where in 1928, she co-starred in West of Zanzibar. The film stars Lon Chaney and Lionel Barrymore, with Nolan cast as Chaney's defiled daughter Maizie. The film was a hit and Nolan's performance is spectacular.

Mary Nolan (1902 – 1948) b. Mary Imogene Robertson, was a Ziegfeld girl at the tender age of 15. Her nickname was Bubbles — which gives  some insight into young Mary’s character. She gained notoriety for her very public affair with Frank Tinney, a popular vaudeville star who was married. Nolan eventually made her way to Hollywood where in 1928, she co-starred in West of Zanzibar, directed by Tod Browning. The film stars Lon Chaney and Lionel Barrymore, with Nolan cast as Chaney’s defiled daughter Maizie. The film was a hit and Nolan’s performance is superb.

 

In 1929, Nolan starred in Desert Nights opposite John Gilbert, once again the Kentucky born Nolan turned in a finely calibrated performance. Unfortunately, Nolan had a taste for abusive men. She carried on an affair with MGM fixer Eddie Mannix, who beat Nolan to a pulp wench she threatened to tell Mannix's wife of the affair. Nolan was hospitalized for six months and endured fifteen surgeries. Basically, except for small parts in small movies, her career was over.

In 1929, Nolan starred in Desert Nights opposite John Gilbert. Once again the Kentucky born Nolan turned in a finely calibrated performance. Unfortunately, Nolan had a taste for abusive men. She carried on an affair with MGM fixer Eddie Mannix, who beat Nolan to a pulp when she threatened to expose their affair to Mannix’s wife. Nolan was hospitalized for six months and endured fifteen surgeries. Except for small parts in small movies, Nolan’s career was over.

 

Nolan put together a night club act. She sang, she told stories of her glory days as a Ziegfeld girl and a Hollywood star. She was also a heroine addict. The picture was taken in 1937. Nolan was but 35 years old.  In 1948, her body was discovered in her small apartment, dead from an overdose of Seconal. She was 48 years old.

Unable to find work in Hollywood, Nolan put together a nightclub act. She sang, she danced, she told stories of her glory days as a Ziegfeld girl and a Hollywood star. She was also a heroin addict. This picture was taken in 1937 when  Nolan was but 35 years old. In 1948, Nolan’s body was discovered in her shabby Los Angeles bungalow, dead from an overdose of Seconal. She was 46 years old.

 

Elizabeth Taylor wearing a wonderful dress. Have no idea who designed it, but the cut and silhouette are perfect.

Elizabeth Taylor is wearing a wonderful dress. I have no idea who designed it, but the cut, silhouette, and lines perfectly highlight Taylor’s womanly shape. When did ladies stop wearing white gloves? If you’re looking for a signifier of cultural decline, the fall of white gloves gets my vote.

 

“Two White Dresses” by John  Singer Sargent, completed in 1911.

And while we’re on the subject of beautiful dresses: “Two White Dresses” by John Singer Sargent, completed in 1911.

 

MM when she was still Norma Jean.

MM when she was still Norma Jean.

 

Offspring#2 was allowed to bring a one page “cheat sheet” into a Jewish history test when she was in high school. After the test, I took her cheat sheet and had it framed. It is beautiful, one of my most cherished pieces of art.

In high school, Offspring#2 was allowed to bring a one page “cheat sheet” into a Jewish history quiz. After the test, I took the beautifully rendered drawing and had it framed. It is beautiful, one of my most cherished pieces of art.

 

Child survivors of Buchenwald form a Magen David, 1946.

Child survivors of Buchenwald form a Magen David, 1946.

 

Livia and Maayan wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

Livia and Maayan wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

This entry was posted in Friday Footwear, Friday Fotos, Glamour, Hollywood, Hollywood Stars, Hollywood Still Photography, Holocaust, Jewish Photography, Livia Yarden, Maayan Ariel, Marilyn Monroe, Mary Nolan, Movies, Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

16 Comments

  1. Miranda Rose Smith
    Posted January 25, 2015 at 3:36 am | Permalink

    I rear white gloves on formal occasions.

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  2. Michael Kennedy
    Posted January 24, 2015 at 7:42 pm | Permalink

    Poor Marilyn. A classmate of mine’s father was her psychiatrist who she called the night she died.

    A friend did her autopsy. Sad life. If only she could have stayed with Dimaggio.

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    • kishke
      Posted January 25, 2015 at 7:54 am | Permalink

      DiMaggio had lots of problems of his own. It wasn’t the fairytale match portrayed in the media. Read Richard Ben Cramer’s book.

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  3. CJReott
    Posted January 24, 2015 at 3:17 pm | Permalink

    What a tragedy regarding Ms. Nolan. Is the picture at the nightclub in 1937 showing the damage done to her face from the beating? BTW – heroin drug, not heroine. Claudia

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted January 25, 2015 at 10:07 am | Permalink

      Yes, that’s Nolan backstage at some seedy nightclub. I’m not sure if her ravaged appearance is the result of beatings or drugs. Probably both.

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  4. sennacherib
    Posted January 23, 2015 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

    Okay, I have to ask. What is/are techeles and shul?

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted January 23, 2015 at 2:55 pm | Permalink

      Shul is Yiddish for synagogue.

      Techeles is the ancient blue dye used in the tzizis, fringes, orthodox Jews wear. Here’s a link that explains techeles in more detail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tekhelet.

      I thought I linked in the body of the post, but apparently I screwed up. Sorry.

      Have a great weekend.

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      • sennacherib
        Posted January 23, 2015 at 4:40 pm | Permalink

        Thanks,
        This kind of stuff fascinates me. If you ever want to read a really good book “A Perfect Red” by Butler is one I recommend. A very enjoyable read about the red dye produced by cochineal and why it was considered much more valuable than gold.

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        • sennacherib
          Posted January 24, 2015 at 3:00 pm | Permalink

          One more question, if you can answer without giving away insider info. When you guys are out busy shape shifting do you have do anything special with your tzizis, such as roll them up to keep them from flying around?

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          • kishke
            Posted January 25, 2015 at 7:53 am | Permalink

            We never roll up our tzitzis. They’re like a flying carpet. That’s how we get around.

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            • Robert J. Avrech
              Posted January 25, 2015 at 10:08 am | Permalink

              Kishke:

              You gave away our secret:-)

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              • sennacherib
                Posted January 25, 2015 at 11:34 am | Permalink

                Aha! Well it could still be quiet dangerous. During the “Flying Nun” era when I was in parochial school the hallways could be very dangerous with the nun’s zooming past with unsecured rosaries. When Sister Leo attempted an outside loop in the Assembly Hall vestibule there were several injuries, lacerations etc.

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  5. kishke
    Posted January 23, 2015 at 12:05 pm | Permalink

    If Nolan was born in ’02 and died in ’48, then she died at age 46 not 48.
    Have a great Shabbos!

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted January 23, 2015 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

      Kishke,

      Thanks so much for the correction. Good Shabbos.

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  6. Pearl
    Posted January 23, 2015 at 10:45 am | Permalink

    I love the 4 final pics:

    Norma Jean is the girl next door in that pic. Replace her blond tresses with dark ones, and she sort of resembles your younger daughter. It’s the eyes… Or is it the smile? In any case, it’s my humble opinion.

    The Jewish history test cheat sheet — and I am fascinated that you had it framed. What a wonderful, colorful, original idea.

    The Buchenwald survivors’ Magen David pose speaks volumes.

    The 2/3 granddaughters’ pic is heartwarming.

    Have a wonderful Shabbos, and wishing you — and us all — a peaceful week ahead.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted January 23, 2015 at 1:58 pm | Permalink

      Pearl, I’m so glad you like the final four. The MM pic is really exceptional. Have a wonderful Shabbat.

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