Friday Photos: Trompe L’oeil Nation

John Haberle, “Leave Your Order Here” oil on canvas, 1895. John Haberle (1856–1933) was a 19th-century American painter in the trompe l'oeil (literally, "fool the eye") style. He is considered one of the three major figures—together with William Harnett and John F. Peto—practicing this form of still life painting in the United States in the last quarter of the 19th century.

John Haberle, “Leave Your Order Here” oil on canvas, 1895. John Haberle (1856–1933) was a 19th-century American artist best known for his trompe l’oeil paintings. He is considered one of the three major figures—together with William Harnett and John F. Peto—practicing this form of still life painting in 19th century America.

The idea is to fool the eye, to convince the viewer that the object exists in three dimensions. But of course, the surface is flat. It is a masterful illusion.

So it is with Barack Obama and the postmodern Democrat party, who wage a ceaseless campaign of political trompe l’oeil. The Constitution, the separation of powers, America’s national borders, the very meaning of citizenship, all are being rendered illusions in order to better serve the totalitarian ideology that is at the heart of the Democrat party.

From the very beginning of his run for the Presidency, Obama spun a spiderweb of illusions, sure in the knowledge that the color of his skin was impenetrable armor against criticism. When Obama’s spiritual mentor Jeremiah Wright was unmasked as an American and Jew-hating bigot, Obama claimed that in 20 years he never — not once — heard any of Wright’s hateful sermons.

Only the willfully gullible would believe Obama’s shameless denial.

The list of Obama’s lies is as long as the mountain of gibberish that is Obamacare. And as Jonathan Gruber smirked, that law was designed to fool a foolish people.

Obama’s greatest work of trompe l’oeil is on behalf of radical Islam. Obama thanked “Muslim Americans for their many achievements and contributions to building the very fabric of our nation and strengthening the core of our democracy.”

Even for Obama, this is an incandescent fantasy, a rewriting of American history that is half lies and the other half untrue.

And now that Benjamin Netanyahu has alerted the American people to Obama’s unAmerican appeasement to Tehran, Obama is going to bypass Congress — the voice of the American people — in favor of a dubious U.N. ratification.

On that grim note let’s tale a look at our latest collection of stills that will, hopefully, brighten our mood.

Jean Harlow with her 1932 Packard. Harlow's two best movies are “Red Dust” ('32) and “Bombshell” ('33).

Jean Harlow with her 1932 Packard. Harlow’s two best movies are “Red Dust” (’32) and “Bombshell” (’33).

 

Otis Kaye (1885–1974) is best known for his trompe l'oeil paintings in which US currency is featured. This, perhaps his best known work, is ttiled D-JIA-VU? (37). You will not be surprised to learn that Kaye lost all his money in the stock market crash of 1929. The WSJ just published a fine article about a survey of his work.

Otis Kaye (1885–1974) is best known for his trompe l’oeil paintings in which U.S. currency is featured. This, perhaps his best known work, is ttled D-JIA-VU? (’37). You will not be surprised to learn that Kaye lost all his money in the stock market crash of 1929. The WSJ just published a fine article about his work.

 

Most photos of Garbo present the illusion of a mysterious seductress. This casual snapshot gives us a smiling, very human woman. By far, her best film is  “Ninotchka”, a comedy, and perhaps the best critique of Communism ever filmed.

Most photos of Garbo present the image of a brooding, alluring and enigmatic beauty. But this casual snapshot gives us a smiling, very human woman. By far, her best film is “Ninotchka” (’39) a comedy, and perhaps the best critique of communism ever produced.

 

The legendary New York Giants pitcher Christopher  Mathewson, 1910.

The legendary New York Giants pitcher Christopher Mathewson, 1910.

 

My father, Rabbi Chaplain Abraham Avrech z'l, taking time out from his duties as a Chaplain in the 42nd Division to play ball. This pic was taken sometime in the 1950s.

My father, Rabbi Chaplain Abraham Avrech z’l, taking time out from his duties as a Chaplain in the 42nd Division to play ball. This pic was taken sometime in the 1950s.

 

Yours truly in baseball mode. Some of my best memories are playing catch with my father on hot Summer days.

Yours truly in baseball mode. Some of my best memories are playing catch with my father on hot Summer days.

 

Worshippers leaving the Altshtot, Old City, synagogue on Wolborska Street. Photograph Moshe Raviv. Lodz, 1937.

Worshippers leaving the Altshtot, Old City, synagogue on Wolborska Street. Photograph Moshe Raviv. Lodz, 1937.

 

Jean Bugatti with his personal 1932 Royale. They really, really don't make 'em like they used to.

Jean Bugatti with his personal 1932 Royale. They really, really don’t make ’em like they used to.

 

Kissing before curfew, 1950 Michigan State University.

Kissing before curfew, 1950 Michigan State University.

 

Another fine trompe l'oeil painting, Faithful Colt, by William Harnett.

Another fine trompe l’oeil painting, “Faithful Colt”, by William Harnett, 1890.

 

Rita Hayworth gets her make-up done. Notice the lips on the wall. Something for everyone.

Rita Hayworth gets her make-up done. Notice the choice of lipstick styles on the wall. Something for everyone, 1940s.

 

The model is Betty Jane Persky AKA Lauren Bacall. Photo by Louise Dahl for Harpers Bazaar, 1943.

The model is Betty Jane Persky AKA Lauren Bacall. Photo by Louise Dahl for Harpers Bazaar, 1943.

 

Karen and I were strolling along La Brea Avenue when I saw this rug in an antique store. I was mesmerized by the bright bold stripes which reminded me of...

Karen and I were strolling along La Brea Avenue when I saw this rug in an antique store. I was mesmerized by the bright bold stripes which reminded me of…

 

This painting by Juan Usle, “Miron”, 2006 - 07, vinyl, dispersion, dry pigment on canvas.

… this painting by Juan Usle, “Miron” 2006 – 07, vinyl, dispersion, dry pigment on canvas.

 

I commissioned artist Judith Margolis to do this charcoal sketch of a Burberry raincoat on a closet door in Casa Avrech.  Everyone who enters our home smiles when they look at it.

Karen and I commissioned artist Judith Margolis to execute this charcoal drawing of a Burberry raincoat on a closet door in Casa Avrech. Everyone who enters our home smiles when they see it.

 

Photos of Marilyn Monroe when she was young and not yet a pro playing to the camera are particularly charming and powerful.

Photos of Marilyn Monroe when she was not yet a hardened pro playing to the camera are charming and poignant.

 

Maayan Ariel and Livia Yarden wish all our friends and relatives an inspirational Shabbat.

Maayan Ariel and Livia Yarden wish all our friends and relatives an inspirational Shabbat.

This entry was posted in Abraham Avrech, Art, Friday Fotos, Greatest Movies of the 1930s, Greta Garbo, Hollywood Stars, Hollywood Still Photography, Jean Harlow, Jew-haters, Jew-hatred, Jihad Watch, Marilyn Monroe, Muslim Brotherhood, Obama Watch, Obamacare, Painting, Rita Hayworth, Stars and Cars and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

12 Comments

  1. kgbudge
    Posted March 16, 2015 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

    Maayan Ariel is also not yet a hardened pro in front of the camera.

    May it long remain so.

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  2. GW
    Posted March 13, 2015 at 3:44 pm | Permalink

    I second Moishe3rd, always look forward to your Friday eclectic collection of pictures.

    I’ll add one point to the discussion here about the “willfully gullible.” One of the most fascinating things I discovered in my research of the era of the American Revolution was the degree to which the Founding Fathers mistrusted democracy. They mistrusted and despised open democracy as much as they mistrusted and despised rule by a King.

    When it came time to write a Constitution, they were quite literally torn between their realization that the Revolution would not have occurred but for the unwashed masses and complete mistrust of rule by the same. Their great fear was that the large body of people, not paying close attention, could be swayed by obfuscation and lies from a charismatic person.

    That is why, in 1792, they provided for the direct election of only 1/6th of the Federal government officials — the House of Representatives. Senators were appointed by Governors. Judges were appointed by a President with advice and consent. And Presidents were not to be popularly elected. Rather, people would vote for representatives to attend a convention where they would examine and listen to the candidates, and only then choose — i.e., the electoral college.

    At any rate, that is a long way of getting around to my point. When you way “willfully gullible,” you are talking about precisely the type of people our Founding Father’s wanted to protect against. Well, them and the man those people elected.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 13, 2015 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

      GW:

      Thanks so much for another lucid history lesson. Mark Levin talks (screams) about this on his radio show on a daily basis: Rule by Mob.

      I fear that if Hillary, or another Democrat takes the White House in ’16, this country will be on its knees to the progressive mob for the foreseeable future.

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    • Posted March 13, 2015 at 4:32 pm | Permalink

      I believe that it was Alexander Hamilton who, speaking on the pitfalls of Democracy, said: “The People? The People sir, is a Great Beast! (from Revelations)”

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    • pkoning
      Posted March 17, 2015 at 9:32 am | Permalink

      Actually, prior to the 17th amendment, senators were elected by the legislature of each state — not the governor.
      As for Hamilton, one should remember that he supported unlimited government (however much he pretended otherwise when writing in the Federalist Papers). See his proposal to the Convention (on June 18) — which was ignored at the time. But in fact, the reality we have today of essentially unlimited government and politicians elected for life very closely matches what Hamilton wanted, even though the letter of the Constitution clearly calls for something utterly different than what we ended up with.

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  3. Michael Kennedy
    Posted March 13, 2015 at 3:16 pm | Permalink

    For a moment, seeing the first illustration, I thought the post might be about the effects of Seattle’s new minimum wage law. The restaurants in the city are closing. Pretty soon, all there will be is self service and a black board for your order.

    https://shiftwa.org/more-seattle-restaurants-close-doors-as-15-minimum-wage-approaches/

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 13, 2015 at 4:32 pm | Permalink

      Karen and I were in Seattle a few months ago where we spent Shabbat on Mercer Island with out friends Michael and Diane Medved. He took us on a tour of your city and outlined the insane minimum wage laws. It is so sad to see such a lovely city being shredded by crypto Marxists.

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      • Michael Kennedy
        Posted March 13, 2015 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

        I don’t live there but seriously considered moving there and bought 10 acres on Vashon Island about 20 years ago. I finally sold them but still like the area. Seattle is far left politically, unfortunately although that is not why I didn’t move. My kids are all here.

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  4. DrCarol
    Posted March 13, 2015 at 10:27 am | Permalink

    Loved these photos, the last one most of all.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 13, 2015 at 4:32 pm | Permalink

      Dr. Carol:

      Thanks so much. We heartily agree.

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  5. Posted March 13, 2015 at 5:30 am | Permalink

    You are an artist, Mr. Avrech. And, that’s it. I am going to start Sharing your Fine Fridays on Facebook. Have a good Shabbos.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 13, 2015 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

      Moishe:

      Thanks so much for the kind words. Have a wonderful Shabbat.

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