Friday Photos: True Hollywood Confessions

“Real art is basic emotion. If a scene is handled with simplicity - and I don't mean simple - it'll be good, and the public will know it.” —John Wayne

“Real art is basic emotion. If a scene is handled with simplicity — and I don’t mean simple — it’ll be good, and the public will know it.”
—John Wayne

Mark Rothko, No 10, 1950

Mark Rothko, No 10, 1950

 

Anthony van Dyck, Self-Portrait with Sunflower, 1632, oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm.

Anthony van Dyck, Self-Portrait with Sunflower, 1632, oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm.

 

Ori Gersht, I Bought You These Flowers But They Exploded in the Most Amazing Way, 2014

Ori Gersht, I Bought You These Flowers But They Exploded in the Most Amazing Way, 2014

 

Pieter de Hooch, The Courtyard of a House in Delft, 1658 Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm

Pieter de Hooch, The Courtyard of a House in Delft, 1658, Oil on canvas, 73 x 60 cm

 

Julie Blackmon, Power of Now, 2008

Julie Blackmon, Power of Now, 2008

 

Sharon Ya'ari, David Ben-Gurion's Bed, Kibbutz Sde Boker, 2012 Archival Pigment Print 25.98 x 33.07 in | 66 x 84 cm Edition of 5

Sharon Ya’ari, David Ben-Gurion’s Bed, Kibbutz Sde Boker, 2012 Archival Pigment Print 25.98 x 33.07 in. Edition of 5

 

Gene Davis, Black, Grey Beat, acrylic on canvas 90 3/4 x 187 in. 1964

Gene Davis, Black Grey Beat, acrylic on canvas, 90 3/4 x 187 in. 1964

 

Harry Callahan, Atlanta, 1943

Harry Callahan, Atlanta, 1943

 

Morris Louis, Number 28, 1961

Morris Louis, Number 28, acrylic on canvas, 91 in. x 78 in. 1961

 

 

“How can a motion picture reflect real life when it is made by people who are living artificial lives?” —Miriam Hopkins

“How can a motion picture reflect real life when it is made by people who are living artificial lives?”
—Miriam Hopkins

 

Harry Callahan, Horseneck Beach, Massachusetts C. 1971

Harry Callahan, Horseneck Beach, Massachusetts
C. 1971

 

Pavel Wolberg, Gaza Border, 2008 C-Print 26 x 71 in | 66.5 x 180 cm Edition of 5

Pavel Wolberg, Gaza Border, 2008 C-Print 26 x 71 in. Edition of 5. To really see this photo click to enlarge.

 

Brett Weston Leaf and Rain Drops, 1979 Gelatin silver print 106 3:10 × 116 1:10 in 270 × 295 cm

Brett Weston, Leaf and Rain Drops, 1979 Gelatin silver print 106 3:10 × 116 1:10 in 270 × 295 cm

 

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, 2012

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, 2015

 

This film was never produced.

Hurricane starring Marlene Dietrich and directed by Josef von Sternberg was never produced.

 

“I can't believe I was ever that thin.” —Joan Fontaine's comment on just having seen herself in Rebecca, fifty years after she had starred with Laurence Olivier in the Hitchcock film.

“I can’t believe I was ever that thin.”
—Joan Fontaine’s comment on just having seen herself in Rebecca, fifty years after she had starred with Laurence Olivier in the Hitchcock film. Source: It’s Only a Movie: Alfred Hitchcock, A Personal Biography by Charlotte Chandler.

 

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Portrait of a Woman in Hat with Feathers

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Portrait of a Woman in Hat with Feathers

 

Michal Chelbin, Natalia, Sentenced for stabbing, Juvenile Prison for Girls, Ukraine, 2009

Michal Chelbin, Natalia, Sentenced for Stabbing, Juvenile Prison for Girls, Ukraine, 2009

 

Study Head of a Young Woman, possibly 1618–20 Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599–1641) Oil on paper, laid down on wood; 22 1:4 x 16 3:8 in. (56.5 x 41.6 cm)

Study Head of a Young Woman, possibly 1618–20 Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599–1641) Oil on paper, laid down on wood; 22 1:4 x 16 3:8 in. (56.5 x 41.6 cm)

 

Viktoria Sorochinski, Anna & Eve project, 2005-2010

Viktoria Sorochinski, Anna & Eve project, 2005-2010

 

Francesca Woodman: Untitled, Rome, Italy, 1977-1978

Francesca Woodman: Untitled, Rome, Italy, 1977-1978

 

William Eggleston, Biloxi, Mississippi, 1972

William Eggleston, Biloxi, Mississippi, 1972

 

Sandro Botticelli, Portrait of a young woman (Simonetta Vespucci ?) 1476-1480 Tempera on wood, 47.5 x 35 cm

Sandro Botticelli, Portrait of a young woman (Simonetta Vespucci ?) 1476-1480, Tempera on wood, 47.5 x 35 cm

 

Erwin Olaf, Ymre Stiekemaby for Vogue Netherlands

Erwin Olaf, Ymre Stiekemaby for Vogue Netherlands

 

Natan Dvir, Belief series, Purim

Natan Dvir, Belief series, Purim

 

On April 29, 1974, the Film Society of Lincoln Center honored Alfred Hitchcock, who arrived in a limosine with Alma and Princess Grace. Martin E Segal, the head of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, noticed that Princess Grace had disappeared from the table where special guests were eating, and she was nowhere to be seen. He went in search of her. He found her outside in the hallway, standing alone. “Aren't you going to join us?” he asked her. “Please come and have something to eat.” Kelly declined. “Thank you, but I can't. Do you like my dress?” “It's beautiful and you look beautiful in it.” “That's why I can't eat anything. My dress is so tightly fitted, I can't afford one bite, and if I go inside and watch everyone eating I might be tempted.” “Then please let me bring you a chair.” “Thank you, but I can't sit down because I don't want to wrinkle my dress.” From It's Only a Movie, by Charlotte Chandler

On April 29, 1974, the Film Society of Lincoln Center honored Alfred Hitchcock, who arrived in a limosine with [his wife] Alma and Princess Grace. Martin E Segal, the head of the Film Society of Lincoln Center, noticed that Princess Grace had disappeared from the table where special guests were eating, and she was nowhere to be seen. He went in search of her. He found her outside in the hallway, standing alone.
“Aren’t you going to join us?” he asked her. “Please come and have something to eat.”
Kelly declined. “Thank you, but I can’t. Do you like my dress?”
“It’s beautiful and you look beautiful in it.”
“That’s why I can’t eat anything. My dress is so tightly fitted, I can’t afford one bite, and if I go inside and watch everyone eating I might be tempted.”
“Then please, let me bring you a chair.”
“Thank you, but I can’t sit down because I don’t want to wrinkle my dress.”
Source: It’s Only a Movie: Alfred Hitchcock, A Personal Biography  by Charlotte Chandler

 

Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, 1955

Richard Avedon, Dovima with Elephants, 1955

 

London, England, 1955, French actress Brigitte Bardot is pictured trying on shoes at Rayne's the Queen's shoemakers in Bond Street . Seraphic Secret published this photo of BB in 2011. A few days later we received a lovely note from Nicholas Rayne, who is now reviving his families legendary footwear. Seraphic Secret was delighted to hear that a family business with a long and distinguished history was on the rise. Rayne shoes were worn by Hollywood stars, and European nobility.

In 2011 Seraphic Secret published this 1955 photo of Brigitte Bardot trying on Rayne shoes in their Bond Street store. A few days later we received a lovely note from Nicholas Rayne, who is now reviving the legendary business. Seraphic Secret was delighted to learn that a family business with a long and distinguished history was on the rise. Rayne shoes were once worn by Hollywood stars, and European nobility.

 

Nick was kind enough to send me a copy of a sumptuous book about Rayne. Royal Shoemakers Rayne was founded by Henry & Mary Rayne in London in 1885, and were the pre-eminent British ladies luxury shoe brand throughout the Twentieth Century Rayne is the name synonymous with the best in British 20th-century shoe design. Re-launched as a British-owned company in 2013, the remarkable design achievements of the company in the 20th-century are illustrated in this sumptuous book. The business began in the late 19th-century as a theatrical costumier and soon added shoes to its products, with a factory in Bermondsey near the current Fashion & Textile Museum. Early clients included the Ballet Russes and Nijinsky. By the 1920s, members of the British Royal family and aristocracy were clients and a shop was opened on Bond Street with a new factory based at King's Cross. By 1950, the company had three royal warrants, had suppiled shoes for the wedding of Princess Elizabeth (now Queen Elizabeth II) in 1947, and had a strong American presence with Delman Shoes at Bergdorf Goodman, NYC, amongst other locations. Sir Edward Rayne became a celebrity in his own right and collaborated with many famous designers such as Roger Vivier, Bruce Oldfield, Jean Muir, and the "Fashion Knight" Sir Norman Harnell, and Hardy Amies. In the 1970s, Bill Gibb designed collections for Rayne, and Rayne supplied the shoes for several leading French couturiers houses such as Lanvin and Nina Ricci. In the 1980s Bruce Oldfield designed collections for them. Oliver Messel re-designed the famous Bond Street Store, which attracted stars of stage and screen, such as Elizabeth Taylor, as well as society ladies. Beautifully illustrated, this book offers a complete history of this remarkable brand.

Recently, Nick was kind enough to send me a copy of a spectacular book, Rayne Shoes for Stars. “Royal Shoemakers Rayne was founded by Henry & Mary Rayne in London in 1885, and were the pre-eminent British ladies luxury shoe brand throughout the Twentieth Century
Rayne is the name synonymous with the best in British 20th-century shoe design. Re-launched as a British-owned company in 2013, the remarkable design achievements of the company in the 20th-century are illustrated in this sumptuous book.
The business began in the late 19th-century as a theatrical costumier and soon added shoes to its products, with a factory in Bermondsey near the current Fashion & Textile Museum. Early clients included the Ballet Russes and Nijinsky. By the 1920s, members of the British Royal family and aristocracy were clients and a shop was opened on Bond Street with a new factory based at King’s Cross. By 1950, the company had three royal warrants, had suppiled shoes for the wedding of Princess Elizabeth (now Queen Elizabeth II) in 1947, and had a strong American presence with Delman Shoes at Bergdorf Goodman, NYC, amongst other locations.
Sir Edward Rayne became a celebrity in his own right and collaborated with many famous designers such as Roger Vivier, Bruce Oldfield, Jean Muir, and the “Fashion Knight” Sir Norman Harnell, and Hardy Amies. In the 1970s, Bill Gibb designed collections for Rayne, and Rayne supplied the shoes for several leading French couturiers houses such as Lanvin and Nina Ricci. In the 1980s Bruce Oldfield designed collections for them. Oliver Messel re-designed the famous Bond Street Store, which attracted stars of stage and screen, such as Elizabeth Taylor, as well as society ladies.
Beautifully illustrated, this book offers a complete history of this remarkable brand.” But even more than a history of a brand this book is a history of a family business, a family of visionary entrepreneurs. Highly recommended.

 

Livia Yarden wishes all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

Livia Yarden wishes all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

 

Ed Ruscha, END, 1983, oil on canvas, 36 x 40 inches

Ed Ruscha, END, 1983, oil on canvas, 36 x 40 inches

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9 Comments

  1. Michael Kennedy
    Posted November 2, 2015 at 6:07 pm | Permalink

    “Images are more important than dialogue in the best films.”

    Wasn’t this a characteristic of Hitchcock ? Didn’t he lay out story boards as images ?

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    • Barry
      Posted November 2, 2015 at 7:18 pm | Permalink

      Upon completion of the screenplay, which he had developed with the writers, such as Ernest Lehman, John Michael Hayes, and others.

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  2. Bookworm
    Posted November 1, 2015 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

    You have an incredibly strong visual sense. Looking at these, and without knowing your skill as a writer, it would be easy to think that your role in Hollywood was as a director or some other visual job in movies.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted November 1, 2015 at 2:19 pm | Permalink

      Bookworm:

      Thanks so much for the kind words. The truth is that screenwriters have to have the ability to visualize a movie. Images are more important than dialogue in the best films. In fact, I know some fine screenwriters who do not write very well. But what their scripts lack in literacy is more than made up by their acute visual sense.

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  3. kishke
    Posted October 31, 2015 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

    The Callahan “Atlanta” is beautiful, but I’m confused by the vertical lines of color at the right. Was the building painted that way?

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted November 1, 2015 at 2:21 pm | Permalink

      Kishke:

      I don’t have any insider knowledge about the Callahan photo but I assume that the side of the building is painted as he shot it. The only SFX Callahan ever did, as far as I know, was double exposures. So this seems to be the building as is.

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  4. Bill Brandt
    Posted October 31, 2015 at 12:10 am | Permalink

    Surprised that David Ben Gurion led such a simple life

    I have often marveled at the beauty in such simple things in nature – like the sky – that your eye found.

    Grace – sheesh – what a memorable evening that would have been had she sat with Hitch for a dinner – simple vanity won out over a lifetime memory and picture it seems

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  5. Posted October 30, 2015 at 5:45 am | Permalink

    Thank you, Robert. A wonderful way to begin my day — I so look forward to your Friday posts.

    I’ll admit, I had to open the Wolberg photo before I realized what was actually in the picture.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted October 30, 2015 at 8:57 am | Permalink

      Prophet Joe:

      You are very welcome. After what ends up being, inevitably, an awful week, I look forward to compiling Friday Photos. It is therapeutic.

      As for the Wolberg photo. The IDF is, I’m sure, quite happy that the photo must be clicked to be truly seen.

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