Friday Photos: True Hollywood Confessions

“I loathe acting. I loathe what it does to my life. It cancels it out; you cannot live while you are working. You are a person completely surrounded by unbreachable walls.”
—Margaret Sullavan, via Haywire, one of the finest, if most depressing Hollywood memoirs I have ever read

Edward Hopper
Apartment Houses, East River, 1930
oil on canvas, 35 x 60 in.

 

Harry Callahan
Cuzco, 1974

 

Price for the Art Deco inspired Bovet Amadeo Virtuoso V reference ACHS016-50-P2018 watch is, um, $73,500 and each version is a limited edition of 100 pieces. bovet.com

 

Nico Jesse
Paris c.1950

 

Norma Jean strikes an unusually chaste pose for a Halloween photo.

 

“Let’s be honest, the physical attracts me first. Then if you get to know the man’s mind and soul and heart, that’s icing on the cake.”
—Lana Turner

 

Edward Hopper
From Williamsburg Bridge
1928
73.7 x 109.2 cm

 

Paul Huf
The Netherlands, 1953

 

Poster for The Conversation (’74) by the great Polish graphic artist Jerzy Flisak.

 

The Art of Travel, a 1949 fashion photo by Norman Parkinson

 

Art Deco masterpiece, 1934 Bugatti Type 57 Roadster

 

Edward Hopper
East Side Interior, 1922, etching

 

Photo by Horst P. Horst for Vogue, 1943

 

“Glamour is assurance. It is a kind of knowing that you are all right in every way, mentally and physically and in appearance, and that, whatever the occasion or the situation, you are equal to it.”
—Marlene Dietrich

 

Edward Hopper
House at Dusk, 1935
oil on canvas, 127 x 92.71 cm

 

Piergiorgio Branzi, Comacchio, 1956

 

Swedish poster for The Black Cat, 1934

 

Berenice Abbott, Fifth Avenue Houses, 1936

 

The Balcony Room
by Adolph Menzel
1845
w47.0 x h58.0 cm
Oil on canvas

 

Vivian Maier, Canada, Undated

 

15th C. the ‘Almanzi Pentateuch’ with Haftarot and Five Scrolls (Hamesh megillot). Portugal (Lisbon) Hebrew Sephardi square script, punctuated. frontispiece with initial-word panels and full floral border with owl, in colors and gold.

 

Livia, Lielle, and Ariel wish all our friends and relatives a delicious Shabbat.

 

This entry was posted in Art, Art Deco, Edward Hopper, Fashion, Friday Fotos, Judaica, Judaism, Lana Turner, Margaret Sullavan, Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, Movie Posters, Movies, Painting, Photography, Quotes, True Hollywood Confessions and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

5 Comments

  1. Bill Brandt
    Posted November 4, 2018 at 2:26 pm | Permalink

    From Wikipedia on Margarat Sullivan (on her death)

    On January 1, 1960, at about 5:30 p.m., Sullavan was found in bed, barely alive and unconscious, in a hotel room in New Haven, Connecticut. Her copy of the script to Sweet Love Remembered, in which she was then starring during its tryout in New Haven, was found open beside her. Sullavan was rushed to Grace New Haven Hospital, but shortly after 6:00 p.m. she was pronounced dead on arrival.[38] She was 50 years old. No note was found to indicate suicide, and no conclusion was reached as to whether her death was the result of a deliberate or an accidental overdose of barbiturates.[39] The county coroner officially ruled Sullavan’s death an accidental overdose.[40] After a private memorial service was held in Greenwich, Connecticut, Sullavan was interred at Saint Mary’s Whitechapel Episcopal Churchyard in Lancaster, Virginia.[41]

    For her contribution to the motion picture industry, Margaret Sullavan has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame located at 1751 Vine Street.[42] She was inducted, posthumously, into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1981.[43]

    That is depressing.

    It would be a nice exercise to list the Hollywood starts who remained “grounded” and didn’t let themselves be affected by fame.

    Jimmy Stewart is the first who comes to my mind.

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  2. Bill Brandt
    Posted November 3, 2018 at 12:42 pm | Permalink

    I like your B & W photos. The Canada one – my guess is mid to late 50s with the oval window on the VW.

    A friend of mine, long time photographer, said that film B & W is making a Renaissance. Maybe I’ll be glad i didn’t toss my trusty well-traveled Nikon F3.

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    • Michael Kennedy
      Posted November 4, 2018 at 7:32 am | Permalink

      When I was in college, I so wanted one of those VWs but they were $1200 ! Out of sight for me at the time. The little Fiats, similar to the 600s we see around today, were $600. Still out of reach for a kid on a scholarship.

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  3. Michael Kennedy
    Posted November 2, 2018 at 1:18 pm | Permalink

    Isn’t this the second week for that Marlene Dietrich photo ?

    Te “Fifth Avenue Houses” looks like a Hooper painting but it’s a photo. I like Hopper a lot.

    My daughter works for an artist whose paintings are sort of mass produced in his studio and sell for a fortune. I don’t like any of them or any of the modern paintings like his.

    I am amazed at the prices the son of a medical school classmate gets.

    His father, my classmate, is a psychiatrist, which might explain it.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted November 2, 2018 at 1:51 pm | Permalink

      My bad, Dietrich was two weeks ago. That’ll teach me not assemble Friday Photos at the last minute. I included the Abbott photo as complimentary counterpoint to the Hopper cityscapes.

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