Friday Photos: True Hollywood Confessions

“I always thought that if I ever got good reviews I'd be happy. It's so empty. It's never what I wanted, ever. All I wanted was just what everybody else wants, you know - to be loved.” —Rita Hayworth

“I always thought that if I ever got good reviews I’d be happy. It’s so empty. It’s never what I wanted, ever. All I wanted was just what everybody else wants, you know — to be loved.”
—Rita Hayworth

Dante Gabriel Rossetti 1828–1882 “Monna Vanna” 1866 Oil paint on canvas Support: 889 x 864 mm frame: 1290 x 1168 x 92 mm

Dante Gabriel Rossetti 1828–1882
“Monna Vanna”
1866
Oil paint on canvas
Support: 889 x 864 mm
frame: 1290 x 1168 x 92 mm

 

A rare view of Joan Crawford’s freckles, 1947. A natural redhead (her friend the actor/interior designer Billy Haines nicknamed her “Cranberry”), Joan never attempted to hide her freckles in real life, but they were hidden in her films and most publicity portraits with careful editing and over-lighting. When she posed for portraits for the great George Hurrell, Crawford slathered her face with Vaseline which picked up the reflection of the bright lights Hurrell used, allowing her freckles to be more easily obliterated during the editing process. As someone who freckles a tad in the sun myself, I find her natural complexion quite charming.

A rare, unretouched photo of Joan Crawford — with her freckles, 1947. Crawford was a natural redhead who never attempted to hide her freckles offscreen. But they were made to disappear in her films and most publicity portraits through the artful use of make-up and diffused lighting.

 

Photo Martin Munkacsi, Procession, Budapest, 1934

Photo Martin Munkacsi, Procession, Budapest, 1934

 

Ormond Gigli, Models in Windows, New York, 1960

Ormond Gigli, Models in Windows, New York, 1960

 

Mark Rothko, Yellow, Blue on Orange, 1955

Mark Rothko, Yellow, Blue on Orange, 1955

 

“Much more frequent in Hollywood than the emergence of Cinderella is her sudden vanishing. At our party, even in those glowing days, the clock was always striking twelve for someone at the height of greatness; and there was never a prince to fetch her back to the happy scene.” —Ben Hecht, Hollywood's greatest screenwriter

“Much more frequent in Hollywood than the emergence of Cinderella is her sudden vanishing. At our party, even in those glowing days, the clock was always striking twelve for someone at the height of greatness; and there was never a prince to fetch her back to the happy scene.”
—Ben Hecht, Hollywood’s greatest screenwriter

 

Sir William Rothenstein, “A Corner of the Talmud School” 1907, oil on canvas

Sir William Rothenstein, “A Corner of the Talmud School” 1907, oil on canvas.

 

Angelica Kauffmann, Self-Portrait, 1787, Oil on canvas, 128 x 94 cm

Angelica Kauffmann, Self-Portrait, 1787, Oil on canvas, 128 x 94 cm

 

Jean Harlow in her kitchen, glamorously unglamorous, 1931.

Jean Harlow in her kitchen, glamorously unglamorous, 1931

 

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, 1991. Thanks to my cousin Alter Raubvogel who rescanned and cleaned up this photo.

Robert J. Avrech, “Silent Picture”, 1991. Thanks to my cousin, graphic designer, Alter Raubvogel who rescanned and cleaned up this photo.

 

Helen Frankenthaler, Eve, 1995

Helen Frankenthaler, Eve, 1995

 

“What I'd really like to say about stardom is that it gave me everything I never wanted.” —Ava Gardner

“What I’d really like to say about stardom is that it gave me everything I never wanted.”
—Ava Gardner

 

Thought to be Jacqueline de Bourgogne by Jan Gossaert, c.1530.

Thought to be Jacqueline de Bourgogne by Jan Gossaert, c.1530.

 

Artist: Johannes Vermeer Start Date: c.1665 Completion Date:c.1666 Style: Baroque Genre: genre painting Technique: oil Material: canvas Dimensions: 45 x 39.9 cm

Johannes Vermeer, “Young Girl Writing a Letter”
c.1665 – 1666
oil on canvas
45 x 39.9 cm

 

Sarah Hobbs, “Insomnia” 2000.

Sarah Hobbs, “Insomnia” 2000

 

sunsetblvd1
sunsetblvd2

Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Boulevard” 1950 Written by Charles Brackett Billy Wilder D. M. Marshman, Jr.

Gloria Swanson in “Sunset Boulevard” 1950
Written by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder, D. M. Marshman, Jr.

 

Brice Marden Red Rocks (2) 2000-2002 oil on linen, 75 x 107 in.

Brice Marden
Red Rocks (2)
2000-2002
oil on linen, 75 x 107 in.

 

Lielle Meital and Maayan Ariel wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspiring Shabbat.

Lielle Meital and Maayan Ariel wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspiring Shabbat.

 

Ed Ruscha, END 1983 oil on canvas 36 x 40 inches

Ed Ruscha, END
1983
oil on canvas
36 x 40 inches

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24 Comments

  1. Michael Kennedy
    Posted January 10, 2016 at 9:02 am | Permalink

    If I remember correctly, the nuns with the turned up head dresses are nursing sisters. They are Sisters of Charity who tended the French wounded in the Crimean War. Florence Nightingale had wanted to train with them as a young women but her family was opposed as women in nursing were considered debauched and unchaste. The French Sisters of Charity wore the “Flying Nun” style head dresses called a “cornette.” I thought it had to do with cleanliness but it was simply a peasant style in the 16th century.
    http://www.daughtersofcharity.com/who-we-are/history/

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    • sennacherib
      Posted January 12, 2016 at 9:49 am | Permalink

      I think you’re Michael. But they had to give them up to make more room on the flight decks.

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      • sennacherib
        Posted January 12, 2016 at 2:35 pm | Permalink

        I meant to say you’re right Michael.

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  2. Barry
    Posted January 9, 2016 at 9:45 pm | Permalink

    Sennacherib,

    My responses are all messed up and I did not know how to reclaim and/or reconstitute them. We should have this conversation, or not, at a later date. Sorry for the confusion. Mine.

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    • sennacherib
      Posted January 10, 2016 at 4:22 am | Permalink

      Barry,
      No worry, I wake up confused, it’s part of being Irish. I don’t think I did a very good job conveying my point, oh well another time.

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      • Kimosabbe
        Posted January 10, 2016 at 1:27 pm | Permalink

        May I ask how you arrived at your screen name? (I think I might’ve chosen Hezekiah) 🙂

        My brother and I used “kimosabbe” as a term of endearment when we were kids.

        Anyway, just curious

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        • sennacherib
          Posted January 11, 2016 at 4:26 am | Permalink

          I’ve always loved history, but I was one of those who could read well and had a excellent grasp of vocabulary, but couldn’t pronounce words well to save my life. For awhile I got into Assyrian history, but as you can imagine Ashurbanipal, Tiglethpilessar, and Sennacherib were quite challenging until my ex-wife taught me how to pronounce them. So they kind of stuck and when I chose a name I decided Sargon was a little too grand so Sennacherib it was. So when I found this blog that seems to be jewish orientated it was a natural lead in. Careful with the Hezekiah business, I still flinch when I hear that name, plagues and what not you know.

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          • Kimosabbe
            Posted January 11, 2016 at 10:32 am | Permalink

            I see, thank you. I’d been reading the second book of Chronicles a couple of days ago and was reminded of your screen name.

            As for Hezekiak, “… He did what the Lord approved, just as his ancestor David had done.” I’ll stick with Hezekiah 😉

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            • sennacherib
              Posted January 11, 2016 at 11:31 am | Permalink

              Gee Whiz,
              You guys never forget a thing. Probably because you all are always writing it down!

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  3. Kimosabbe
    Posted January 8, 2016 at 3:51 pm | Permalink

    I realize that beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but when I scrolled down from the lovely Rita Hayworth, to the painting of Ms. Alexa Wilding (Rossetti’s model), I immediately went from thinking, “Ah, some of those actresses from an earlier era were unbelievably beautiful”, to “Hey, the NFL wild card games are this weekend”.

    Here’s her Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexa_Wilding

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  4. sennacherib
    Posted January 8, 2016 at 1:37 pm | Permalink

    The Kertesz “Procession picture: The front half of the nuns have just landed while the back half are just touching down, judging from their habits.

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    • Posted January 11, 2016 at 7:03 am | Permalink

      I confess I had not noticed that the first 5-6 rows of nuns are wearing different habits than the rest. Did that denote a different status (seniority, purpose, etc.)?

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      • sennacherib
        Posted January 11, 2016 at 8:57 am | Permalink

        ProphetJoe,
        If I remember right, purpose would be a good way to descibe it. More though along the lines of what order they belong to. Sisters of Charity, Carmelites, Sisters of Perpetual Adoration, etc. I think it could also mean what status they are as a nun proper, postulate, noviate, full fledged etc. I just remember they were a terror to me in grade school while giving the best academic education I ever received.

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  5. Bill Brandt
    Posted January 8, 2016 at 11:16 am | Permalink

    “Much more frequent in Hollywood than the emergence of Cinderella is her sudden vanishing. At our party, even in those glowing days, the clock was always striking twelve for someone at the height of greatness; and there was never a prince to fetch her back to the happy scene.”
    —Ben Hecht, Hollywood’s greatest screenwriter

    I was thinking too that the Cinderella wasn’t even aware of the time at the time…

    “What I’d really like to say about stardom is that it gave me everything I never wanted.”
    —Ava Gardner

    I thought that was a wonderful biography of her – recommended by you of course Robert. I was thinking that Ava could have been the kind of person you could meet randomly in London, take a walk in Hyde Park & talk of anything and everything –

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    • Barry
      Posted January 8, 2016 at 12:20 pm | Permalink

      Film stardom is not the product of conscription. Don’t like it? Walk away. Ava Gardner’s comments are self pitying and untrustworthy.

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      • sennacherib
        Posted January 8, 2016 at 1:35 pm | Permalink

        Barry,
        Yeah, you never saw very many of them quitting the life and running to apply for a sales position at Wal Mart.

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        • Barry
          Posted January 9, 2016 at 10:01 am | Permalink

          Actually quite a few people have walked away. A partial list follows: Greta Garbo. Dolores Hart. Madge Evans. Luise Rainer. Priscilla Lane. Shirley Temple. And then others such as Claudette Colbert, Jean Arthur, Irene Dunne who certainly could have continued but the circumstances, either personal or professional, seemed unappealing.

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          • sennacherib
            Posted January 9, 2016 at 3:19 pm | Permalink

            Barry,
            You’d know this better than I, but I’m willing to bet that the ones that walked away had made enough money to do it without worry.

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            • Barry
              Posted January 9, 2016 at 3:54 pm | Permalink

              Surely not Dolores Hart. And I believe being a film star usually pays well. So what.

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              • Barry
                Posted January 9, 2016 at 5:21 pm | Permalink

                I didn’t express myself correctly here. My concern is not with these indiduals, but rather those that are salute, or seems somehow moved by the plight of the ‘unfortunate’ men and women who have been selected by fate for extraordinary admiration and compensation — while still whining about that privileged. outcome. about the outcome.

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  6. DrCarol
    Posted January 8, 2016 at 8:19 am | Permalink

    I got to see the Vermeer in Boston last month. Beautiful painting. I think I prefer his work to Rembrandt (also at the same show, along with a lot of other Dutch painters I’d never heard of). But my favorite painting at the MFA is still Copley’s Paul Revere, with Stuart’s John Adams a close second.

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  7. sennacherib
    Posted January 8, 2016 at 7:22 am | Permalink

    The jewellery in the Jan Gossaert is fascinating to me.

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  8. Posted January 8, 2016 at 6:40 am | Permalink

    Well done, Robert. Here’s my weekly (or perhaps weak) perspective on your collection this Friday:

    Ben Hecht was a fascinating man. Extremely talented. One of my favorite quotes from him is: “Trying to determine what is going on in the world by reading newspapers is like trying to tell the time by watching the second hand of a clock.” He had the gift of perspective and a firm grasp of the profession of journalism.

    I love the Jean Harlow photo. She looks so domestic and sexy, yet pure. Of course, had she lived a longer life, we might remember her quite differently. Who knows what Hollywood scandals might have tainted her legacy.

    I had to research the Gigli photo “Models in Windows”. At first I thought it might be a miniature because the arms and legs looked unnaturally posed to me. It turns out I was wrong. As you know, it’s a photo from a block of brownstones about to be demolished. Too bad. I love that architecture and I imagine the buildings which replaced that block were modern and cold. I find this a very artistic and fun photo.

    My wife complains that she can’t shut off her brain at bedtime, so I think that Hobb’s “Insomnia” captures her situation quite well — although I can’t imagine my wife ever using those linens on our bed. 🙂

    Marden’s Red Rock (2) is a bit of a puzzle to me. I see rubber bands… ?

    And your granddaughters may have a future in modeling! I hope you and Karen have a wonderful Sabbath.

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