Friday Photos: True Hollywood Confessions

“To all the girls that think you’re fat because you’re not a size zero, you’re the beautiful one, its society who’s ugly.” ― Marilyn Monroe

“To all the girls that think you’re fat because you’re not a size zero, you’re the beautiful one, its society who’s ugly.”
― Marilyn Monroe

Govern Flinck The Expulsion of Hagar Oil on canvas, 110.7 x 138.8 cm

Govern Flinck, Dutch, 1615-1660
The Expulsion of Hagar, c. 1640-’42
Oil on canvas, 110.7 x 138.8 cm

 

Michal Barat Koren Hagar 2014, C-Print

Michal Barat Koren
Hagar
2014,
C-Print

 

Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman, Spellbound

Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman, Spellbound, 1945, screenplay by Angus MacPhail, Ben Hecht.

 

Stuart Davis. Lucky Strike, 1924. Oil on paperboard, 18″x24″.

Stuart Davis, Lucky Strike, 1924. Oil on paperboard, 18″x24″

 

Irene Dunne by Roman Freulich, 1932

Irene Dunne by Roman Freulich, 1932

 

Winslow Homer American painter (b. 1836, Boston, d. 1910, Prouts Neck) Summer Night 1890 Oil on canvas, 77 x 102 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris

Winslow Homer
American painter (b. 1836, Boston, d. 1910, Prouts Neck)
Summer Night
1890
Oil on canvas, 77 x 102 cm
Musée d’Orsay, Paris

 

“Never say never, for if you live long enough, chances are you will not be able to abide by its restrictions. Never is a long, undependable time, and life is too full of rich possibilities to have restrictions placed upon it.” —Gloria Swanson

“Never say never, for if you live long enough, chances are you will not be able to abide by its restrictions. Never is a long, undependable time, and life is too full of rich possibilities to have restrictions placed upon it.”
—Gloria Swanson

 

Self Portrait, Captain Thomas Smith was a seventeenth-century American artist and mariner who completed a self-portrait circa 1680, which is the earliest known self-portrait from America. And the only known self portrait by a Puritan.

Captain Thomas Smith was a seventeenth-century American artist and mariner who completed this self-portrait circa 1680. This painting is the earliest known self-portrait in America, and the only known self-portrait by a Puritan.

 

Richard Avedon, Jean Shrimpton, 1965

Richard Avedon, Jean Shrimpton, 1965

 

John Frederick Peto Lincoln and the Star of David 1904 Private collection oil on canvas Height: 50.8 cm (20 in.), Width: 35.56 cm (14 in.) The Star of David suggests a lost Moses.

John Frederick Peto
Lincoln and the Star of David
1904
Private collection
oil on canvas
Height: 50.8 cm (20 in.), Width: 35.56 cm (14 in.)
The Star of David implies a lost Moses.

 

Louis Comfort Tiffany American painter and designer (b. 1848, New York, d. 1933, New York) Au nouveaux cirque, Papa Chrysanthème 1894-95 Favrile glass, leaded, 120 x 85 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris

Louis Comfort Tiffany
American painter and designer (b. 1848, New York, d. 1933, New York)
Au nouveaux cirque, Papa Chrysanthème
1894-95
Favrile glass, leaded, 120 x 85 cm
Musée d’Orsay, Paris

 

Childe Hassam American painter and printmaker (b. 1859, Dorchester, d. 1935, East Hampton) Sunset at Sea 1911 Oil on hessian, 86 x 86 cm Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham

Childe Hassam
American painter and printmaker (b. 1859, Dorchester, d. 1935, East Hampton)
Sunset at Sea
1911
Oil on hessian, 86 x 86 cm
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham

 

“You bring out a lot of your own thoughts and attitudes when acting. I think a great deal of it has to do with the inner you. You know, there’s nothing damnable about being a strong woman. The world needs strong women. There are a lot of strong women you do not see who are guiding, helping, mothering strong men. They want to remain unseen. It’s kind of nice to be able to play a strong woman who is seen.” —Ginger Rogers

“You bring out a lot of your own thoughts and attitudes when acting. I think a great deal of it has to do with the inner you. You know, there’s nothing damnable about being a strong woman. The world needs strong women. There are a lot of strong women you do not see who are guiding, helping, mothering strong men. They want to remain unseen. It’s kind of nice to be able to play a strong woman who is seen.”
—Ginger Rogers

 

James Abbot McNeill Whistler American painter and printmaker (b. 1834, Lowell, d. 1903, London) Nocturne in Blue and Gold: Old Battersea Bridge 1872-75 Oil on canvas, 67 x 49 cm Tate Gallery, London

James Abbot McNeill Whistler
American painter and printmaker (b. 1834, Lowell, d. 1903, London)
Nocturne in Blue and Gold: Old Battersea Bridge
1872-75
Oil on canvas, 67 x 49 cm
Tate Gallery, London

 

Joseph's Coat Mennonite Quilt Circa 1880 Pennsylvania

Joseph’s Coat Mennonite Quilt
Circa 1880
Pennsylvania

 

Gene Davis Sour Ball Beat 1964 acrylic on canvas 126.36 x 106.68 cm

Gene Davis
Sour Ball Beat
1964
acrylic on canvas
126.36 x 106.68 cm

 

Andrew Wyeth Open and Closed 1964

Andrew Wyeth
Open and Closed
1964

 

Jeff Gusky ‘Corridor in Kazimierz (Former Jewish District) Cracow, Poland 1996

Jeff Gusky ‘Corridor in Kazimierz (Former Jewish District) Cracow, Poland 1996

 

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, Teaneck, N.J. 2016

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, Teaneck, N.J. 2016

 

Marriage Ring Mila Tanya Griebel, British, b. 1963 London, England, 2006 Silver: hand-worked and pierced; agate 3 1/16 × 15/16 × 5/8 in. (7.8 × 2.4 × 1.6 cm)

Marriage Ring
Mila Tanya Griebel, British, b. 1963
London, England, 2006
Silver: hand-worked and pierced; agate
3 1/16 × 15/16 × 5/8 in. (7.8 × 2.4 × 1.6 cm)

 

Jumping for joy, Maayan wishes all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

Jumping for joy, Maayan wishes all our friends and relatives a lovely and inspirational Shabbat.

 

Buster Keaton’s “The Frozen North” (1922)

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13 Comments

  1. Michael Kennedy
    Posted June 4, 2016 at 2:09 pm | Permalink

    Too bad “Spellbound” was such a crude parody of psychoanalysis. Good movie otherwise.

    The Tiffany shade looks like Toulouse Lautrec’s circus painting.
    http://www.toulouse-lautrec-foundation.org/Equestrienne-(at-the-cirque-fernando)-large.html

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  2. Bill Brandt
    Posted June 3, 2016 at 10:22 pm | Permalink

    “To all the girls that think you’re fat because you’re not a size zero, you’re the beautiful one, its society who’s ugly.”

    Truer words ever spoken.

    Robert you have quite an eye for color and angles. Did you pick a lot of this up while screen writing over the years?

    I would think that in addition to the auditory portion of the movie, i.e. the screenplay, if the visual doesn’t complement that none of it’s good.

    But hey I’m in amateur 🙂

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  3. sennacherib
    Posted June 3, 2016 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

    I didn’t know Captain Thomas Smith was an ancestor of Henny Youngman.

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  4. Larry
    Posted June 3, 2016 at 11:13 am | Permalink

    Interesting problem with the photos sometimes. Mostly they appear, but sometimes — even after refreshing the page — one or two don’t show. Sometimes ones that showed don’t show after the page refresh. For instance, this time the Irene Dunne photo didn’t show, but click the link and the page with the photo alone shows up just fine. Something about the page links isn’t happy.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted June 3, 2016 at 11:45 am | Permalink

      Larry:

      You might try using a different browser. See if that makes a difference.

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      • Terry Trippany
        Posted June 6, 2016 at 12:53 pm | Permalink

        Hi. Just doing a quick look and noticed that the inability to like or dislike is browser specific. Specifically I can not use that feature with Safari. Unfortunately there are so many browsers and subversions in the wild that I can not address each individual request. This is a third party plugin called Comment Rating. I will check for any specific errors in the underlying theme and perhaps we can solve it!

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    • GetThereJustAsSoon
      Posted June 4, 2016 at 7:04 am | Permalink

      I’ve a bit of difficulty, as well. I can post comments, but am unable to register a “Like” or “Dislike.” First time I’ve encountered this.

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    • alterbentzion
      Posted June 5, 2016 at 7:33 am | Permalink

      I have the same situation as GetThereJustAsSoon – can comment, but can’t like/dislike. I wonder if there’s some WordPress plugin on the server that need updating.

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      • GetThereJustAsSoon
        Posted June 5, 2016 at 11:15 am | Permalink

        alterbentzion,

        I’ve also noticed that email notifications about comments and posts have stopped, at least in my case. There was a WordPress update available. However, I have some problems navigating with it and don’t know whether it has been applied to this site.

        Meanwhile, I’ll just add that I “Like” and enjoy just about all the comments posted here.

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  5. Posted June 3, 2016 at 6:04 am | Permalink

    Another excellent edition, Robert, but I have to ask about the Marriage Ring… I must be missing something in the context. ???

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted June 3, 2016 at 9:41 am | Permalink

      Prophet Joe:

      As far as I know, no one ever actually wears this style of wedding ring. It is a gift that symbolizes the centrality of home. The artistic wedding ring is usually left on display in the home.

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    • alterbentzion
      Posted June 3, 2016 at 9:56 am | Permalink

      We generally don’t use ornate wedding rings, because it’s hard to quickly eyeball them and guess their worth. (On a technical level, the groom is paying the bride for her hand in marriage.)

      Imagine having that ring on your finger during a marital dispute!

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