Friday Photos, True Hollywood Secrets: How to be Beautiful

Audrey Hepburn’s doe-eyed look was her trademark. Along with a strong brow, and efforts to keep the rest of her makeup neutral, Hepburn focused on her lashes to draw attention to her eyes. To ensure separation of each lash, her makeup artist used to apply mascara — and then painstakingly separate each lash using a safety pin.

Audrey Hepburn’s doe-eyed look was her trademark. Along with a strong brow, and efforts to keep the rest of her makeup neutral, Hepburn focused on her lashes to draw attention to her eyes. To ensure separation of each lash, her makeup artist used to apply mascara — and then painstakingly separate each lash using a safety pin. ”

Gerrit Dou , “Old Woman Reading a Bible” c. 1630 Oil on wood, 71 x 56 cm Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Gerrit Dou, “Old Woman Reading a Bible”
c. 1630
Oil on wood, 71 x 56 cm
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

 

Bert Stern, Gary cooper, 1960

Bert Stern, Gary Cooper, 1960

 

Harald Slott-Moller, Midsummer's Eve, 1904

Harald Slott-Moller, Midsummer’s Eve, 1904

 

“She” is a 1925 British-German fantasy adventure directed by Leander de Cordova and starring Betty Blythe, Carlyle Blackwell, Mary Odette. It's based on H. Rider Haggard's novel of the same name. The book had at least five short film adaptations, in 1908, 1911, 1916, 1917, and 1919.

“She” is a silent 1925 British-German fantasy adventure starring Betty Blythe. It’s based on H. Rider Haggard’s novel of the same name. Blythe was one of the first actresses to appear nude in films. She famously quipped: “A director is the only man besides your husband who can tell you how much of your clothes to take off.”

 

Henry Clarke, Della Oakes wearing Balenziaga, 1951.

Henry Clarke, Della Oakes wearing Balenciaga, 1951.

 

Fractions #17 1960 / Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009) Fractions # 17, 1960. Hammersley was a critically acclaimed American abstract painter whose participation in the landmark 1959 Four Abstract Classicists exhibit secured his place in art history, as the first "hard edge" artists. He painted cool abstractions which were very different from the emotional ones of the established abstract expressionist movement.

Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009) Fractions # 17, 1960. Hammersley was a critically acclaimed American abstract painter whose participation in the landmark 1959 Four Abstract Classicists exhibit secured his place in art history. Hammersley painted cool abstractions in contrast to the emotional turmoil that characterized abstract expressionists such as Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko.

 

“Celebrity hair and makeup artist Peter Lamas told Style.com that when working with actress Grace Kelly, he noticed her repeatedly applying lotion to her hands. Kelly reportedly said it was because hands are where people show their age first.”

“Celebrity hair and makeup artist Peter Lamas told Style.com that when working with actress Grace Kelly, he noticed her repeatedly applying lotion to her hands. Kelly reportedly said it was because hands are where people show their age first.”

 

Gerrit Dou, “Old Woman Unreeling Threads” 1660-65 Oil on panel, 32 x 23 cm The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Gerrit Dou, “Old Woman Unreeling Threads”
1660-65
Oil on panel, 32 x 23 cm
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

 

Henry Clarke, Fiona Campbell-Walter in Dior, 1951.

Henry Clarke, Fiona Campbell-Walter in Dior, 1951.

 

Harald Slott-Moller, Morning Coffee, 1910

Harald Slott-Moller, Morning Coffee, 1910

 

“Spitfire”, Directed by John Cromwell, Produced byPandro S. Berman, Written by Lula Vollmer (play and screenplay) Jane Murfin (screenplay) Starring Katharine Hepburn Robert Young Ralph Bellamy Released in 1934.

“Spitfire”, written by Lula Vollmer and Jane Murfin, starring Katharine Hepburn, Robert Young, and Ralph Bellamy, 1934.

 

Florence Vandamm, Warner Bros. ingenue Alice White, for Vanity Fair, 1928.

Florence Vandamm, Alice White, for Vanity Fair, 1928.

 

Frederick Hammersley, “On In”, 1961, oil on linen.

Frederick Hammersley, “On In”, 1961, oil on linen.

 

“Unlike many of her counterparts, the lovely Ingrid Bergman was known more for her natural beauty than for being a made-up bombshell. Bergman said she rarely wore makeup outside of when she was filming. She also chalked her looks up to good genes. Her approach to beauty was more about inner wellness. She also made sure to get plenty of exercise, simply by walking and taking the stairs instead of the elevator. She also said one of her favorite things was getting in the sauna and enjoying a rub down.”

“Unlike many of her counterparts, the lovely Ingrid Bergman was known more for her natural beauty than for being a made-up bombshell. Bergman said she rarely wore makeup outside of when she was filming. She also chalked her looks up to good genes. Her approach to beauty was more about inner wellness. She also made sure to get plenty of exercise, simply by walking and taking the stairs instead of the elevator. She also said one of her favorite things was getting in the sauna and enjoying a rub down.”

 

Gerrit Dou, “Old Woman Watering Flowers” 1660-65 Oil on wood, 28,3 x 22,8 cm Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

Gerrit Dou, “Old Woman Watering Flowers”
1660-65
Oil on wood, 28,3 x 22,8 cm
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

 

Irving Penn, Lisa Fonssagrives wearing a bicorne skimmer by Lilly Dache, Vogue, Feb. 15, 1950.

Irving Penn, Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn wearing a bicorne skimmer by Lilly Dache, Vogue, Feb. 15, 1950.

 

Harald Slott-Moller, “My Wife” 1900

Harald Slott-Moller, “My Wife” 1900

 

"Irene" (1926) is a silent romantic comedy film starring Colleen Moore, and partially shot in Technicolor. The film was directed by Alfred E. Green. The scenes which were shot in Technicolor cost a total amount of $100,000. The total budget was $1,500,000. The film exists, with the Technicolor sequences intact.

“Irene” (1926) is a silent romantic comedy film starring Colleen Moore, and partially shot in Technicolor. The scenes which were shot in Technicolor cost $100,000. The total budget for the film was $1,500,000. The film exists, with the Technicolor sequences still intact.

Florence Vandamm, Self Portrait, 1947.

Florence Vandamm, Self Portrait, 1947.

 

Frederick Hammersley, Betwain, #1 1973 oil on linen, 44 x 44 in. (111.8 x 111.8 cm).

Frederick Hammersley, Betwain, #1 1973 oil on linen, 44 x 44 in. (111.8 x 111.8 cm).

 

Robert J. Avrech, Silent Picture, Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, 2016

Robert J. Avrech, Self Portrait, Robertson Blvd., Los Angeles, 2016

 

Lielle (Candyland) and Maayan (Twister) in their Purim costumes wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and meaningful Shabbat.

In their Purim costumes, Lielle and Maayan…

 

... and Livia wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and meaningful Shabbat.

…Livia…

 

...Ariel, and Offspring #3 wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and meaningful Shabbat.

… Ariel and his mommy Offspring #3, wish all our friends and relatives a lovely and meaningful Shabbat.

 

the-end-to-be-continued-clean-comedy-podcast-videos-e1422565812170

 

This entry was posted in Audrey Hepburn, Colleen Moore, Family, Friday Fotos, Grace Kelly, Hollywood, Hollywood Stars, Hollywood Still Photography, Ingrid Bergman, Movie Posters, Silent Movies, True Hollywood Confessions and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

6 Comments

  1. pigpen51
    Posted March 26, 2016 at 3:33 pm | Permalink

    I am sad to say that I have not visited for a long time. I was sent here in a link for your post about Purim. It was a great post, very informative. I had forgotten how much I appreciated your site. I also have to comment about the pictures you have up, with the actresses, the artwork, and most wonderfully, of your family. They all touched me in a fantastic way. You do indeed have beautiful grandchildren, and a happy looking daughter. You have been blessed.
    I have been fortunate enough to have found the website The Zelman Partisans. They are a continuation of Aaron Zelman’s work from JPFO, which had a great history of supporting the 2nd amendment rights for Jews and all Americans. Unfortunately, with the death of Zelman, the organization was sold by a few radical board members to a questionable group. The strong supporters and writers from JPFO left and started TZP.
    It has always been my passion to be a strong advocate for the Jews and the Nation of Israel. I hit upon their site, and have been lucky enough to educate myself more about the history of the Jews and Anti-Semitism. I have been in contact with the ministry of Israel a couple of times by e-mail, to give them words of support and encouragement.
    I also have been involved a lot in commenting on different topics, discussing the Bible with Atheists, and talking about gun rights. It was through this that I was invited to write some for them, and so, I have written a few articles over there.
    I tell you these things so you know a little about who reads your blog, and also, some of the kinds of things going on in support of the Jewish people and their second amendment freedoms.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 31, 2016 at 5:14 pm | Permalink

      Thanks so much for your kind words. And welcome back.

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  2. Bill Brandt
    Posted March 25, 2016 at 7:14 pm | Permalink

    “To ensure separation of each lash, her makeup artist used to apply mascara — and then painstakingly separate each lash using a safety pin. ”

    That’s when you have to have the utmost trust in your makeup artist.
    Your grandchildren are as cute as ever!

    The 1/2 cameos I have seen of Karen (besides her feet) over the years makes me think that offspring #23 bears a strong resemblance to her.

    No wonder you were/are crazy about her.

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  3. Posted March 25, 2016 at 5:50 pm | Permalink

    Excellent, Robert.

    1) Audrey Hepburn certainly did well with her makeup strategy!
    2) Grace Kelly was right about the hands as well.
    3) I can’t decide if Florence Vandamm had a photo behind her, or a photo-bomber.
    4) Betwain #1 reminds me of a Nazi flag… and I had an immediate, internal dislike for it.
    5) I like Hammersley’s “On In” and “Fractions #17” very much (I think it’s just the colors and angles of Betwain.)
    6) I really like “Morning Coffee”. I’m not sure why, but I think of Downton Abbey when I look at it. (Did you and Karen ever watch more of the series?)
    7) It’s nice to see Offspring #3 as well as the grandkids. I see where Ariel gets his smile!

    Hope you and yours have a wonderful Sabbath as well.

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  4. Posted March 25, 2016 at 6:01 am | Permalink

    Lovely photos, as always, Robert. And the smiles on the children are so wonderful. It’s nice to be reminded of the pockets of beauty that survive in what seems like such a hopeless world.

    I like that Betty Blythe quote. She also said, referring to the (lack) of clothing she wore in The Queen of Sheba (which was actually going to be a Theda Bara film before Fox let her go), that, if she wore all her costumes at once, she still wouldn’t be able to keep from catching a cold.

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    • Robert J. Avrech
      Posted March 25, 2016 at 5:05 pm | Permalink

      Thanks so much. Betty Blythe was quite a good actress, and very funny about her movie nudity. Too bad she’s not better remembered.

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    Annual Ariel Avrech
    Memorial Lectures

    Young Israel of Century City
    NOTE: Click on video titles inside the thumbnail images, below, to open that video in YouTube

    Fifteenth: June 10, 2018
    Jackie Danicki: “Confessions of a Convert: A Humbling, Joyful Journey to Judaism.”

    Blog Post | Audio: (94 MB)
    Fourteenth: June 11, 2017
    Daniel Greenfield: “Fighting Anti-Semitism and Defending Israel in the Age of BDS.”

    Blog Post | Audio: (100 MB)
    Thirteenth: May 22, 2016Ben Shapiro: “How You Can Save Israel”

    Blog Post | Audio: (70 MB)
    Twelfth: June 7, 2015
    Larry Elder: “The New Black Anti-Semitism”

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    Eleventh: June 8, 2014
    Michael Medved: “Shifting Alliances: Why Liberals No Longer Reliably Support Israel — And Conservatives Do.”

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    Tenth: June 9, 2013
    David Horowitz: “The War Against Judaism on the University Campus.”

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    Joel B. Pollak: “The Mainstream Media’s Betrayal of Israel.”

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    Yossi Klein Halevi: “What is Expected of a Survivor People: Lessons My Father Taught Me.”

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    Dennis Prager: “Happiness is a Mitzvah, Not an Emotion.”

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    Rabbi Steven Pruzansky: “Conformity in Jewish Life: Vice, Virtue or Affectation?”

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    Fifth: June 15, 2008
    Rabbi Dr. Gil S. Perl: “What Was the Rosh Yeshiva Reading: Intellectual Openness in 19th Century Lithuania.”

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