The Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature

Okaaaay! Any chance to mention our favorite writer, Jane Austen — we’ll take it.

Sure the Iranians are calling for the death of Israel and every Jew on the face of the earth, the North Koreans are scary as heck, the PA and their seventeen “security services” are hoping to be the new Einsatzgruppen, and Olmert and Co. are about as dumb a ruling party as the Jewish state has ever had–but hey, what else is new?

We’ve always got Jane, and honestly, this book, The Politically Incorrect Guide to English and American Literature, sounds like a wonderful antidote to the childish, self-indulgent academic leftists who, for too long, have poisoned the groves of academia.

FP: What are some of your favorite works of English literature and what do they mean to you?

Kantor: Jane Austen’s novels are right up there. The conventional wisdom now is that Austen was a really very “subversive” author—that her books are full of secret rage against “the patriarchy.” Nothing could be further from the truth. As I argue (with lots of examples from Austen’s side-splittingly funny novels) in The Politically Incorrect Guide, Austen is an astute observer of human nature who was well aware that most men would be immensely improved if they were a little more patriarchal than they are. Austen’s novels may be the most fun books in the English language. And they’re also a boost to your moral intelligence. They really inspire you to aim for personal integrity.

“…English Professors are a threat to our civilization”

To read the entire interview at Front Page Magazine, please click here.

Hat Tip: Seraphic Friend, Jeremiah

This entry was posted in Books. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.

5 Comments

  1. Robert J. Avrech
    Posted November 30, 2006 at 11:30 am | Permalink

    Jeremiah:
    This culture has made itself prisoner to PC language and thought.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  2. Posted November 30, 2006 at 10:30 am | Permalink

    Talk about politically incorrect: On Thanksgiving I read a Faulkner short story to a small group. The story employed the word “nigger” a few times. It was awkward to read, I almost stumbled over it. But awkward is not the same as taboo….

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Posted November 30, 2006 at 6:26 am | Permalink

    Exactly. So by PRETENDING you like her, you could save future generations from the same fate. I realize this involves a little dishonesty, but so does espionage.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. Robert J. Avrech
    Posted November 29, 2006 at 11:58 am | Permalink

    Jake:
    Oh gosh, I’d rather stick my head in an oven than read Sylvia Plath.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. Posted November 29, 2006 at 11:23 am | Permalink

    Now Jane Austen is good, but perhaps if we started rumors about some other English Lit. 101 staples being the darlings of conservatives we could save future generations from having to read the likes of Sylvia Plath et al? I mean once the University types hear that right wingers are fond of an author, there’s a good chance they’ll take them off the syllabus. I think this is worth doing for my daughter’s sake alone.

    Like or Dislike: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Friends

    Hollywood

    Politics, Bloggers & News